Book Reviews

Fitzgerald Didn't Satisfy This Author, So She Wrote Her Own 'Gatsby'-Inspired Novel

NPR Books - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 13:56

Stephanie Powell Watts' No One Is Coming to Save Us isn't quite a retelling of The Great Gatsby; instead, it uses similar themes to tell a story about black characters in a declining furniture town.

(Image credit: Marian Carrasquero/NPR)

Categories: Book Reviews

New Film Celebrates Emily Dickinson's Poetry And 'Quiet Passion'

NPR Books - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 13:55

Many people find fascination in Dickinson's mysterious, reclusive life. But British film director Terence Davies says it was her poetry, more than her personal life, that drew him in.

(Image credit: Johan Voets/Hurricane Films/Courtesy of Music Box Films)

Categories: Book Reviews

How Can The Colorado River Continue To Support 36 Million People In 7 States?

NPR Books - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 10:24

New Yorker staff writer David Owen says that convoluted legal agreements and a patchwork of infrastructure determine how water from the Colorado is allocated. His new book is Where The Water Goes.

Categories: Book Reviews

By the Book: Lesley Stahl: By the Book

New York Times Book Review - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 04:00
The journalist and author of “Becoming Grandma” says Ann Patchett’s “Bel Canto” reminded her of Gabriel García Márquez, a high compliment: “My all-time favorite book . . . is ‘Love in the Time of Cholera.’”
Categories: Book Reviews

By the Book: Lesley Stahl: By the Book

New York Times Book Review - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 04:00
The journalist and author of “Becoming Grandma” says Ann Patchett’s “Bel Canto” reminded her of Gabriel García Márquez, a high compliment: “My all-time favorite book . . . is ‘Love in the Time of Cholera.’”
Categories: Book Reviews

All Roads Lead Back To Florida In 'Sunshine State'

NPR Books - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 04:00

Sarah Gerard's lucid, atmospheric essay collection draws on her experiences growing up in Florida for a candid memoir that mixes first-person memories with thoughtful big-picture reporting.

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Categories: Book Reviews

Bookends: Which Force is More Harmful to the Arts: Elitism or Populism?

New York Times Book Review - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 03:00
Adam Kirsch and Liesl Schillinger discuss the art yielded by populist and elite mind-sets.
Categories: Book Reviews

Bookends: Which Force is More Harmful to the Arts: Elitism or Populism?

New York Times Book Review - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 03:00
Adam Kirsch and Liesl Schillinger discuss the art yielded by populist and elite mind-sets.
Categories: Book Reviews

File This Under Nostalgia: New Book Pays Tribute To The Library Card Catalog

NPR Books - Thu, 04/13/2017 - 01:37

Today, people use the antique wooden cabinets to store their knick-knacks. But these card catalogs once held the keys to a world of information. A new Library of Congress book explores their history.

(Image credit: The Library of Congress/Chronicle Books)

Categories: Book Reviews

Trump's Win Changed The Game For Publishers On The Left And The Right

NPR Books - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 13:57

For years, conservative publishers thrived as their readers flocked to books aimed directly at taking down the party in power. Now, with Republicans in control, they have to rethink their strategy.

(Image credit: David Goldman/AP)

Categories: Book Reviews

'The Souls Of China' Documents Country's Dramatic Return To Religion

NPR Books - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 13:32

When the author Ian Johnson first visited China in 1984, he says religious life appeared to be dead. Today, he says China is experiencing a dramatic return to religion, and he documents this in a new book called The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao.

Categories: Book Reviews

Juan Felipe Herrera On Poetry In Tough Times

NPR Books - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 10:49

Juan Felipe Herrera is the 21st Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. NPR met with Herrera on World Poetry Day, March 21, 2017, to talk about the role of poetry in society.

(Image credit: Beck Harlan/NPR)

Categories: Book Reviews

In 'Exes,' The Losses Pile Up Like New England Snowdrifts

NPR Books - Wed, 04/12/2017 - 07:00

Max Winter's bleak, powerful debut novel is haunted by missing people — and those who feel their absence. It centers around a man trying to piece together his estranged brother's last years.

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Categories: Book Reviews

Wed, 12/31/1969 - 17:00
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